What Happened to the Aztecs and the Mayans

What Happened to the Aztecs and the Mayans?

Despite the rapid growth both civilizations had witnessed throughout the centuries, the Aztecs and Mayans eventually came to an end for different reasons. 

Overpopulation, foreign invasion, insurrection, and the loss of trade means are all hypotheses for the demise. The Mayans had also suffered from drought, deforestation, and starvation. As for the Aztecs, in 1521, Hernan Cortez defeated Tenochtitlan with the help of a huge number of indigenous allies. The city was completely devastated.

The Aztec political capital was what are now Mexico City and the surrounding area. This was the seat of the Aztec Empire. Because Mexico City and the territory around it create a wide valley (or basin) surrounded by high mountains, we name the area the ‘Basin of Mexico’ or ‘Valley of Mexico.’ In the past, the rivers that poured down the mountains formed Lake Texcoco, a large lake in the valley where the Aztecs founded their major city on an island.

Because Mexico City was built on the lake, just a little portion of it survives today. Guatemala, Belize, western Honduras, and western El Salvador were all part of the Maya civilization, which spanned the Yucatan Peninsula (which includes the Mexican states of Campeche, Yucatan, Quintano Roo, and part of Tabasco). The Maya, unlike the Aztecs, never had an empire. The Maya civilization was divided into many city-states, some of which grew to be more powerful than others. 

Do The Aztec And Maya Still Exist?

Yes, they do! Of course, the Maya people still live today, and they are rather numerous (several million in southeastern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador). They are currently predominantly Christians, yet they speak Maya and follow Maya customs. Mayas never had a cohesive language; instead, they spoke one of a family of related languages.

An even larger group of native Spanish speakers, largely of Amerindian Maya heritage, claim the title for themselves; they may practice some Maya rituals, and their Spanish has Maya grammatical oddities.

The Nahua are the descendants of the Aztecs that live today. More than 1.5 million Nahua people live in small settlements strewn throughout vast swaths of rural Mexico, working as farmers and occasionally selling handicrafts. The Nahua are one of roughly 60 indigenous groups that currently exist in Mexico.

What Happened To The Aztec And Mayan Empire?

The Aztec and Mayan empires were wiped out because of Spanish colonization and invasion (for the Aztecs), and environmental degradation (for the Mayans). 

Long before Cortez invaded the lands of the Aztecs, the Mayan civilization came to a tragic end due to various reasons. The Maya southern lowlands declined and were abandoned in the 8th and 9th centuries. Overpopulation, foreign invasion, insurrection, and the loss of trade means are all hypotheses for the demise. The Mayans had also suffered from drought, deforestation, and starvation. 

As for the Aztecs, in 1521, Hernan Cortez defeated Tenochtitlan with the help of a huge number of indigenous allies. The city was completely devastated. On the site of the capital, the Spanish established a new town, Mexico City, and began colonizing Central America. Smallpox came out in 1520-21 and was a major factor in the city’s demise, with 10% to 50% of the population succumbing to the epidemic.

Did Aztecs And Mayans Fight?

Well, not really! And that is due to historical evidence‚Ķ and logic. 

Around AD 2 900, the Mayan civilization vanished. Around AD 1 300, roughly 400 years after the Mayans vanished; the Aztec civilization arose, at last. 

If by “the Aztecs” we mean the Aztec Empire before the arrival of the Spaniards. On the Maya border, there were Aztec garrisons and most likely plans to assault. The Aztecs, on the other hand, were attacked by Spaniards. 

However, if we define “the Aztecs” as surviving warriors from the Aztec Empire’s territories in Mexico, then the answer is yes. Thousands of indigenous warriors who were previously Aztecs or Aztec subjects were present in every Spanish incursion into Maya territory from the 1520s to the 1540s. Without the cooperation of these “Aztecs,” the Spaniards would not have been able to build colonies in Yucatan and Guatemala.

Summary:

Despite their disastrous downfall, the Aztec and Mayan civilization are still historically immortal to this very day as their achievements benefited the whole world in a later generation. 

Most of current Mexicans have a mix of Aztec and European ancestry. A considerable amount of Aztec poetry has survive because it was collected during the conquest. Romances de Los Senores de la Nueva Espana is the most important collection of these poems. 

The Nahuatl language is spoken by 1.5 million people, largely in hilly parts of central Mexico. The old Aztec names can still be found in several parts of Mexico City.

In rural portions of Mexico and Guatemala, Mayan languages are still spoken. Due to the mistaken notion that the end of the Maya calendar predicted the end of the world in 2012, the Mayas’ astrological observations and calendars have recently gained a lot of attention.